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null / Credit: ShutterstockACI Prensa Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 16:30 pm (CNA).In two separate recent incidents, participants at Mass in Argentina started chanting the political slogan "the country is not for sale," an expression of opposition to the policies of President Javier Milei. Videos showing the chanting have circulated on social media, leading several bishops to speak out about the situation.One of the Masses was celebrated by the auxiliary bishop of Buenos Aires, Gustavo Carrara, who later issued a statement "humbly apologizing" to those who might have felt offended. Although he did not participate in the chanting, as the celebrant he took responsibility for what had happened.The archbishop of Buenos Aires, Jorge García Cuerva, also spoke out about the incidents during a June 15 Mass at St. Ildephonsus Parish, making it clear that "the Mass is something sacred.""Here we come to be nourished by unity, brotherhood, peace. That's why it's not good to use the Mass to divide,...

null / Credit: Shutterstock

ACI Prensa Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 16:30 pm (CNA).

In two separate recent incidents, participants at Mass in Argentina started chanting the political slogan "the country is not for sale," an expression of opposition to the policies of President Javier Milei. Videos showing the chanting have circulated on social media, leading several bishops to speak out about the situation.

One of the Masses was celebrated by the auxiliary bishop of Buenos Aires, Gustavo Carrara, who later issued a statement "humbly apologizing" to those who might have felt offended. Although he did not participate in the chanting, as the celebrant he took responsibility for what had happened.

The archbishop of Buenos Aires, Jorge García Cuerva, also spoke out about the incidents during a June 15 Mass at St. Ildephonsus Parish, making it clear that "the Mass is something sacred."

"Here we come to be nourished by unity, brotherhood, peace. That's why it's not good to use the Mass to divide, to fragment, to be partisan," he added.

Two more bishops have now commented on the matter. 

In an interview with Radio 10, the bishop of San Justo, Eduardo García, when asked about the "political tone" that has been attributed to the actions of the Church lately said it "would seem that since there is no opposition, we [the Church] are the opposition."

"We are doing what we have to do, what we always do, and perhaps it becomes more visible and stronger because the reality is more painful," he said in defense of the Catholic Church and its solidarity work in the face of the crisis besetting Argentina.

"Reality kills the story," García added. "You have to get down to reality, look at the people, ask questions, see what is happening to them."

Regarding the videos going viral of people chanting political slogans at Mass, García said: "We are in a critical moment, what is critical is accentuated, perhaps, by the issue of communications, social media, that anyone can say anything and it's taken as truth, then that creates even more confusion."

"I believe that social media used well, coming from the truth, ethically, with common sense and with sensitivity can do a lot of good; when used coming from another place they are very harmful," he concluded.

In a June 15 post on Facebook, the bishop of San Francisco in Argentina, Sergio Osvaldo Buenanueva, also referred to what happened, expressing his appreciation for Carrara's gesture of apologizing for the incident.

"In a polarized country like ours, the power of social media quickly makes incomplete information go viral. Thus people rush to take positions and make judgments, largely unappealable. And social harmony is greatly diminished," the prelate noted.

"This polarization also hurts our Christian communities," lamented Buenanueva, who, referring to Carrara, said that "the words and the gesture of the bishop are sincere and ameliorating, and so they are appreciated."

"The Mass cannot be used to promote political causes," he pointed out, "not because politics is bad, but because that's not the purpose of the Mass, which is to glorify God and sanctify the baptized, strengthen the unity of the Church and promote its mission in the world, also encouraging 'better politics' as Pope Francis says and Bishop Carrara has aptly noted."

"This video, like another one that circulated before, causes estrangement, discouragement, and annoyance in many good Catholics, both pastors and especially laypeople," he acknowledged. 

"The vast majority of our Christian communities, when they celebrate the Eucharist, do so with deep faith and respect for the sacred mystery," Buenanueva noted, pointing out that "some minority positions and — in my opinion — also anachronistic positions, cannot make us lose sight of the rich life of faith, mission, and commitment of our communities throughout the country."

"I say it again that I value the gesture of Bishop Gustavo Carrara because it expresses the will to work for the harmony that animates all bishops. It is the power of the charity of Christ to which we must always return so that he may transform us into artisans of peace," he concluded.

This story was first published by ACI Prensa, CNA's Spanish-language news partner. It has been translated and adapted by CNA.

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null / Credit: Josh Applegate/UnsplashACI Prensa Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 17:30 pm (CNA).The culture of life suffered two setbacks as the culture of death advanced again in Spain: The government is proposing to extend euthanasia to people with mental illness, while the Constitutional Court ruled in favor of abortion for minors 16 and over without parental knowledge.According to the Diario Médico journal, the Spanish government's Ministry of Health is going to modify the "Manual of Good Practices for Euthanasia" to include mental illnesses.The draft of the planned change states that the Organic Law for the Regulation of Euthanasia "does not exclude mental illness, allowing people with an unbearable suffering due to the presence of a mental illness to request PAM [aid in dying] on ??equal terms with those whose suffering comes from a bodily illness."Consequently, the government would apparently allow euthanasia for people with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD),...

null / Credit: Josh Applegate/Unsplash

ACI Prensa Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 17:30 pm (CNA).

The culture of life suffered two setbacks as the culture of death advanced again in Spain: The government is proposing to extend euthanasia to people with mental illness, while the Constitutional Court ruled in favor of abortion for minors 16 and over without parental knowledge.

According to the Diario Médico journal, the Spanish government's Ministry of Health is going to modify the "Manual of Good Practices for Euthanasia" to include mental illnesses.

The draft of the planned change states that the Organic Law for the Regulation of Euthanasia "does not exclude mental illness, allowing people with an unbearable suffering due to the presence of a mental illness to request PAM [aid in dying] on ??equal terms with those whose suffering comes from a bodily illness."

Consequently, the government would apparently allow euthanasia for people with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), schizophrenia, or those who are bipolar.

In addition, the Constitutional Court upheld a provision in a recently passed law that allows minors 16 years of age and older to abort their baby without the knowledge and permission of their parents.

The VOX political party had filed a challenge to the constitutionality of the latest changes to the abortion law made in February 2023.

This change in the law, in addition to allowing minors to make a decision of this magnitude without the involvement of their parents or legal guardians, establishes other anti-life measures.

Eliminated from the provisions of the previous law were the three-day waiting period after the initial appointment for an abortion and the practitioner's obligation to provide complete information, which could include ultrasounds, alternatives to abortion, and the methods and risks involved in abortion.

Furthermore, the changes to the law now upheld by the Constitutional Court mandate that abortion be deleted from the patient's medical history after five years.

VOX told Spanish media that the court's ruling affects "millions of young women who are left helpless at a time when they are most vulnerable." According to the political party, it is "a decision against the value of human life" that creates "the configuration of a society without a culture of life and that represents another attack on the family, parental authority, and the duty and right of parents to ensure the well-being of their children."

Also in February 2023, the Constitutional Court dismissed an appeal against the abortion law passed in 2010. This was a decision surrounded by controversy due to accusations of lack of impartiality on the part of the judges since at least four of them had been involved in the legislative process for the law under appeal.

In response the Christian Lawyers Foundation filed a complaint with the European Court of Human Rights for prevarication against the president of the Constitutional Court, Cándido Conde-Pumpido.

This story was first published by ACI Prensa, CNA's Spanish-language news partner. It has been translated and adapted by CNA.

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Pro-abortion activists gather in front of pro-life advocates outside of a Planned Parenthood clinic in downtown Manhattan on Feb. 3, 2024, in New York City. / Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesCNA Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 17:45 pm (CNA).A New York court ruled in favor of putting a proposed amendment to enshrine a right to abortion in the state constitution back on the Nov. 5 ballot, but Republicans plan to take the fight to appeal.The unanimous appellate court decision on June 18 reverses a lower court ruling that would have taken the proposal off of state ballots.Although the lower court had ruled that the state did not follow the proper procedure when approving the ballot language, the appellate court found that the lawmakers who challenged the procedure had done so after the statute of limitations had passed. For this reason, the appellate court dismissed the complaint entirely.Republican opponents of the ballot measure intend to appeal the appellate ru...

Pro-abortion activists gather in front of pro-life advocates outside of a Planned Parenthood clinic in downtown Manhattan on Feb. 3, 2024, in New York City. / Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

CNA Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 17:45 pm (CNA).

A New York court ruled in favor of putting a proposed amendment to enshrine a right to abortion in the state constitution back on the Nov. 5 ballot, but Republicans plan to take the fight to appeal.

The unanimous appellate court decision on June 18 reverses a lower court ruling that would have taken the proposal off of state ballots.

Although the lower court had ruled that the state did not follow the proper procedure when approving the ballot language, the appellate court found that the lawmakers who challenged the procedure had done so after the statute of limitations had passed. For this reason, the appellate court dismissed the complaint entirely.

Republican opponents of the ballot measure intend to appeal the appellate ruling to New York's highest court, according to the Associated Press.

"We continue to believe the Legislature violated the constitution when it adopted the proposal," said David Laska, a party spokesperson, according to the AP report. "We will fight this proposal in the courts and, if necessary, at the ballot box."

New York Attorney General Letitia James praised the appellate court ruling for allowing the proposal back on the ballot. 

"Today's decision to put the Equal Rights Amendment back on the ballot in November is a huge victory in our efforts to protect our basic rights and freedoms," James said in a statement.

"The ERA was advanced to protect access to abortion care, enshrine this basic right in our constitution, and protect people from discrimination," James added. "We will continue to do everything in our power to protect these rights and ensure everyone can live safely and freely in the great State of New York."

Although the proposed "Equal Rights" amendment does not use the word "abortion," it would establish broad rights to "reproductive health care" by prohibiting any discrimination based on "pregnancy, pregnancy outcomes, and reproductive health care and autonomy."

The text would also prohibit discrimination based on a person's sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression.

Constitutional amendments to establish abortion rights will also appear on the ballots in other states on Nov. 5, including Colorado and Florida.

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Arizona Gov. Katie Hobbs sits in the audience prior to President Joe Biden's remarks at the Tempe Center for the Arts on Sept 28, 2023, in Tempe, Arizona. / Credit: Rebecca Noble/Getty ImagesCNA Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 15:45 pm (CNA).Arizona Gov. Katie Hobbs this week vetoed a bill that would have required insurance companies to cover "detransitioning" procedures for transgender-identifying individuals who had undergone sex-change surgeries.The Democratic governor vetoed state Senate Bill 1511 after it passed both houses of the state Legislature. The measure would have stipulated that health insurance plans that offer "coverage for gender transition procedures" may not "deny coverage for gender detransition procedures."It would have also required that physicians who perform gender transition procedures "must agree to provide or pay for the performance of gender detransition procedures.""Detransitioners," or transgender-identified individuals who have ceased trying ...

Arizona Gov. Katie Hobbs sits in the audience prior to President Joe Biden's remarks at the Tempe Center for the Arts on Sept 28, 2023, in Tempe, Arizona. / Credit: Rebecca Noble/Getty Images

CNA Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 15:45 pm (CNA).

Arizona Gov. Katie Hobbs this week vetoed a bill that would have required insurance companies to cover "detransitioning" procedures for transgender-identifying individuals who had undergone sex-change surgeries.

The Democratic governor vetoed state Senate Bill 1511 after it passed both houses of the state Legislature. The measure would have stipulated that health insurance plans that offer "coverage for gender transition procedures" may not "deny coverage for gender detransition procedures."

It would have also required that physicians who perform gender transition procedures "must agree to provide or pay for the performance of gender detransition procedures."

"Detransitioners," or transgender-identified individuals who have ceased trying to make their bodies resemble those of the opposite sex, have been getting increased attention in the media in recent years. 

Oftentimes such people have been on cross-sex hormones for years, resulting in significant or irreversible changes to their bodies; in other cases, they have undergone irreversible surgeries. Extensive medical work can be required to attempt to return their bodies to normal function. 

In a "veto letter" provided to CNA by the governor's office on Wednesday, Hobbs said the measure was "unnecessary and would create a privacy risk for patients."

On its website, the Arizona State Senate Republican Caucus said Hobbs in her veto of the bill was "aiding doctors and insurance companies taking advantage of a vulnerable population."

State Sen. Janae Shamp, who sponsored the bill, argued on Tuesday that doctors "must be prepared to undo the damage" of gender transition procedures "as much as possible."

Insurance companies should also pay for such reparative procedures, she said.

"Shame on Gov. Hobbs for sending a message that the institutions tasked with protecting their health and well-being have turned their backs on them," Shamp said on the state senate GOP's website.

Advocates say detransitioners demonstrate why doctors and health officials should proceed cautiously with transgender procedures, especially given that many of those procedures cannot be easily reversed, if at all. 

Some formerly transgender-identified individuals, such as young adult Chloe Cole, have spoken out strongly against what they say is a too-permissive medical culture that rushes into "gender-affirming" models of care.

In the Netherlands earlier this year, a study found that nearly two-thirds of children who had wished that they belonged to the opposite sex as adolescents ultimately became comfortable with their biological sex in early adulthood.

In an interview with the New York Times last month, meanwhile, English pediatrician Hilary Cass warned there is no comprehensive evidence to support the routine prescription of transgender drugs to minors with gender dysphoria. 

The doctor earlier this year published the independent "Cass Review," commissioned by the National Health Service in England, which prompted England and Scotland to halt the prescription of transgender drugs to minors until more research is conducted.

Shamp, the Arizona senator, this week pointed to Chloe Cole as an example of the perils of transgender medicine.

Cole was "given puberty blockers and underwent a double mastectomy" at a young age and now struggles with "the severe damage left behind," the senator said.

"It's unfathomable that we consider mutilating an undeveloped child's body as 'health care,'" Shamp said, "but what's even more horrifying is the fact that we deny them access to care when they go on to suffer the mental and physical consequences."

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Pilgrims kneel in adoration at a World Youth Day event in Lisbon, Portugal, Aug. 2, 2023. The event was hosted by the U.S. bishops' conference and featured a talk by Bishop Robert Barron culminating in a eucharistic procession and Holy Hour. / Credit: Claudette Jerez/EWTN News video screen shotCNA Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 11:15 am (CNA).The U.S. bishops approved a new pastoral framework for youth and young adult outreach, titled "Listen, Teach, Send," following their spring meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, last week. The framework was approved on Monday, passing with 188 in favor, four against, and four abstentions, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) announced in a Tuesday press release. The initial vote was held at the bishops' spring plenary assembly, but not enough eligible bishops were present to vote and were contacted to cast their votes after, the release noted."We're hoping that 'Listen, Teach, Send' can offer new life for these ministr...

Pilgrims kneel in adoration at a World Youth Day event in Lisbon, Portugal, Aug. 2, 2023. The event was hosted by the U.S. bishops' conference and featured a talk by Bishop Robert Barron culminating in a eucharistic procession and Holy Hour. / Credit: Claudette Jerez/EWTN News video screen shot

CNA Staff, Jun 19, 2024 / 11:15 am (CNA).

The U.S. bishops approved a new pastoral framework for youth and young adult outreach, titled "Listen, Teach, Send," following their spring meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, last week. 

The framework was approved on Monday, passing with 188 in favor, four against, and four abstentions, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) announced in a Tuesday press release

The initial vote was held at the bishops' spring plenary assembly, but not enough eligible bishops were present to vote and were contacted to cast their votes after, the release noted.

"We're hoping that 'Listen, Teach, Send' can offer new life for these ministries in our local Churches," Bishop Robert Barron, who is heading the initiative as chair of the USCCB's Committee on Laity, Marriage, Family Life, and Youth, explained at the USCCB June Plenary Assembly in Louisville, Kentucky. 

Barron noted that it has been 30 years since the "last major moment" for the Church's work with youth, the World Youth Day gathering in Denver, which was accompanied by the release of two national frameworks on youth and young adults. 

"Since then, frankly, enthusiasm has waned while disaffiliation has risen," he told the bishops gathered in Louisville. "It's our fond hope that the 'Listen, Teach, Send' framework, combined with the Holy Father's encouragement in the Synod and Christus Vivit, will be another watershed moment."

Five years ago, Pope Francis published Christus Vivit, "Christ Is Alive!", an apostolic exhortation addressed to young people and the "entire people of God" after the Youth Synod. In response to this, the U.S. bishops authorized this framework in 2021.

The framework, "Listen, Teach, Send: National Pastoral Framework for Ministries with Youth and with Young Adults," follows Jesus' encounter with two disciples on the road to Emmaus and highlights how he listens to them, reveals Scripture to them, and sends them forth. 

"'Listen, Teach, Send' is a summons to the Church to renew her engagement with youth and young adults in imitation of Jesus Christ on the journey to Emmaus," Barron explained.

"Like the Lord in that familiar story, we're called deeply to listen to the realities facing young people with pastoral care and compassion; to teach in a new way that shares the light of Christ with young people and brings about a conversion of heart; and, finally, to send youth and young adults forth so they eagerly choose to follow God's call and their mission to transform the world," he continued. 

Barron and his department took inspiration from ministries such as the National Dialogue, the Hispanic ministry V National Encuentro, and Journeying Together, as well as other bishops' insights in drafting the document.  

"What we heard was a strong desire to develop a framework that was streamlined and straightforward, one that could be used not just by pastors and pastoral ministers but also by families and by young people themselves who can evangelize and guide their peers to Christ," Barron said.

"We heard a desire to name and address issues, including sexuality, mental health, disaffiliation, racial justice, polarization, and the desire of so many young people to transform our society," he continued. "Most importantly, we heard that we cannot be silent or inactive when it comes to the engagement and accompaniment of youth and young adults."

The framework highlights mutual listening, mentorship, evangelization, and vocation, noting that formation should take place in the home and through parents, grandparents, and families but can take place in a variety of contexts.

The USCCB will be releasing complementary and supplemental resources this year with concrete ideas for implementing the framework on a local level.

"In this, we encourage ministry leaders and families to establish conditions for mutual listening to take place: where older generations can truly listen to the young and where the young can truly listen to God speaking to them in the Word and the wisdom of the Church," the document reads.

The document notes that young people "need faith-filled parents and pastoral ministry leaders (and peers) who can lovingly interpret young people's stories through the lens of faith and foster a conversion of the heart."

"Too many youth and young adults today lack mentors in their lives, and yet these wisdom figures can do so much to guide a young person along the right path," it continues. "This experience of accompaniment is something that begins in the family and extends to the teachers, respected adults, Church leaders, and professional connections that a young person encounters as they mature through life."

The framework explains the importance of conveying the whole Gospel, including what may challenge young people.

"The teachings of Christ are countercultural and transformative: seeking God's kingdom first above all, loving enemies, living a moral life, and sacrificing one's own self for the good of others, especially those who are marginalized and forgotten," the document reads. "It may take time to embrace these truths, and young people should be given loving environments where they can ask questions without judgment and wrestle with difficult issues."

"As young people are accompanied on a pilgrimage of faith, they need to hear a clear proclamation of the message of salvation, the implications of Gospel living (including the effects of sin), the embrace of God's mercy, and the unconditional love that Christ offers those who follow him — all inculturated in their lives in a language and style they can understand, appreciate, and appropriate within their own lives," the document notes.

The document concludes by highlighting that young people have a mission to "go where Christ is calling them," highlighting the importance of reaching out to the vulnerable and marginalized, embracing the universal call to holiness, and being transformed by Christ through "prayerful openness" while recognizing God's work in their lives. 

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A bridge over the Mississippi River near St. Louis. / Credit: Checubus/ShutterstockSt. Louis, Mo., Jun 18, 2024 / 16:15 pm (CNA).A pro-abortion lawsuit filed by a number of religious leaders in Missouri was thrown out after a judge ruled that the state's pro-life laws do not infringe on Missourians' freedom of religion.In a June 14 order, the Missouri District Court for the 22nd Judicial Circuit ruled that the references to "Almighty God" in the statutes are similar to references found in the Missouri Constitution, which in turn are similar to sentiments expressed in the Declaration of Independence.A coalition of more than a dozen Missouri religious leaders, including Jews, Christians, and Unitarian Universalists, filed the lawsuit in 2023, alleging that Missouri's near-total abortion ban, which passed in 2019 and took effect after the overturning of Roe v. Wade, violates their religious freedom by invoking God as the creator of human life. Missouri law currently protects ...

A bridge over the Mississippi River near St. Louis. / Credit: Checubus/Shutterstock

St. Louis, Mo., Jun 18, 2024 / 16:15 pm (CNA).

A pro-abortion lawsuit filed by a number of religious leaders in Missouri was thrown out after a judge ruled that the state's pro-life laws do not infringe on Missourians' freedom of religion.

In a June 14 order, the Missouri District Court for the 22nd Judicial Circuit ruled that the references to "Almighty God" in the statutes are similar to references found in the Missouri Constitution, which in turn are similar to sentiments expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

A coalition of more than a dozen Missouri religious leaders, including Jews, Christians, and Unitarian Universalists, filed the lawsuit in 2023, alleging that Missouri's near-total abortion ban, which passed in 2019 and took effect after the overturning of Roe v. Wade, violates their religious freedom by invoking God as the creator of human life. 

Missouri law currently protects all unborn babies from abortion unless the mother's life is at risk. 

The religious leaders had argued that Missouri's abortion laws, which acknowledge "Almighty God [as] the author of life" and also state that life begins at conception, violate the state constitution and the U.S. Constitution.

The Jewish leaders who joined the lawsuit, in particular, argued that Judaism does not recognize unborn children as being alive until after birth.

In the June 14 ruling, Judge Jason Sengheiser also ruled that the outside of the preamble to the law, the rest of Missouri's abortion law language does not contain any explicit religious language, with the judge finding that the state's recognition that life begins at conception is not "only a religious belief" but a "medical and scientific" determination.

Jamie Morris, executive director of the Missouri Catholic Conference (MCC), said in a statement to CNA that the group is "pleased that common sense prevailed and the lawsuit was dismissed."

"The statement 'life begins at conception' is a scientific reality, not a religious belief. As a broader point, many lawmakers rely on their faith in making all types of policy decisions, including those related to welfare, immigration, and the death penalty," Morris said.

"Legislators should not be required to leave their faith at the Capitol door," he said.

In a June 14 statement, the legal team representing the faith leaders said they "respectfully disagree with the court's decision."

"Missouri's abortion ban is a direct attack on the separation of church and state, religious freedom, and reproductive freedom," the statement said.

"Missouri lawmakers made clear that they were imposing their personal religious beliefs on all Missourians when they enacted these laws. We remain committed to restoring abortion access in Missouri."

Like numerous other states, Missouri is facing the prospect of a vote on a ballot initiative this November that, if passed, would erode the state's protections for unborn children.

The MCC is encouraging all Catholics to pray that the state's abortion laws remain in place.

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null / Credit: ADragan/ShutterstockCNA Staff, Jun 18, 2024 / 17:08 pm (CNA).A Texas doctor has been indicted for allegedly breaking federal law after he accessed patient records as part of an exposé into child transgender surgeries. In 2022, Texas Children's Hospital in Houston announced that it would cease performing transgender procedures on minors, citing concerns over "legal ramifications" after state Attorney General Ken Paxton said some of those medical procedures could be considered child abuse under state law. Roughly a year later, journalist Christopher Rufo reported at City Journal that the hospital had "secretly continued to perform transgender medical interventions … on minor children." Rufo cited "whistleblower documents" he obtained from inside the institution. On Monday the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Texas said in a press release that Texas doctor Eithan Haim had been "indicted for obtaining protected individual health info...

null / Credit: ADragan/Shutterstock

CNA Staff, Jun 18, 2024 / 17:08 pm (CNA).

A Texas doctor has been indicted for allegedly breaking federal law after he accessed patient records as part of an exposé into child transgender surgeries. 

In 2022, Texas Children's Hospital in Houston announced that it would cease performing transgender procedures on minors, citing concerns over "legal ramifications" after state Attorney General Ken Paxton said some of those medical procedures could be considered child abuse under state law. 

Roughly a year later, journalist Christopher Rufo reported at City Journal that the hospital had "secretly continued to perform transgender medical interventions … on minor children." Rufo cited "whistleblower documents" he obtained from inside the institution. 

On Monday the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Texas said in a press release that Texas doctor Eithan Haim had been "indicted for obtaining protected individual health information for patients that were not under his care and without authorization." Rufo previously identified Haim as the source of the documents. 

Haim was set to make his first court appearance on Monday afternoon, the attorney's office said. The doctor allegedly "obtained personal information including patient names, treatment codes, and the attending physician" from the Texas children's hospital without authorization. 

He "allegedly obtained this information under false pretenses and with intent to cause malicious harm to TCH," the press release said. 

If convicted, Haim "faces up to 10 years in federal prison and a $250,000 maximum possible fine," the government said. 

Texas has in recent years been at the forefront of the ongoing cultural and legal fight over transgender issues. The Biden administration in 2022 condemned the state policy whereby parents who facilitate "gender transition" medical treatments for children can be investigated for child abuse.  

Gov. Greg Abbott in February of that year directed Texas Family and Protective Services to investigate certain procedures performed on children, including ??castration and hysterectomy, as well as puberty blockers and hormone treatments, as possible instances of child abuse. 

Earlier this month, Paxton announced that the state had "won a major victory" against the Biden administration over the White House's attempt to rewrite federal Title IX law to include transgender protections.

The government's new education rules in part redefined "sex discrimination" under Title IX to include protections for "gender identity." A judge subsequently ruled that the federal government "cannot regulate state educational institutions in this way without violating federal law."

Texas "prevailed on behalf of the entire nation," Paxton said in announcing the ruling. 

The Texas Supreme Court, meanwhile, heard oral arguments in January in a challenge to the state's ban on extreme transgender procedures performed on children. The outcome of that case is still pending.

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U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks at an event marking the 12th anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in the East Room at the White House on June 18, 2024, in Washington, D.C. / Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesWashington, D.C. Newsroom, Jun 18, 2024 / 17:30 pm (CNA).The head of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' (USCCB) Committee on Migration, Bishop Mark Seitz of El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday praised the Biden administration's new plan to offer a pathway to citizenship for undocumented spouses and children of American citizens.This new streamlined process will permit noncitizen spouses married to U.S. citizens to apply to legally live and work in the U.S. without fear of being deported. In addition to the spouses, noncitizen children of applicants would also be allowed to receive such protections.To be eligible for this process, noncitizens must have resided in the U.S. for 10 years or more and be legally married to an...

U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks at an event marking the 12th anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in the East Room at the White House on June 18, 2024, in Washington, D.C. / Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Washington, D.C. Newsroom, Jun 18, 2024 / 17:30 pm (CNA).

The head of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' (USCCB) Committee on Migration, Bishop Mark Seitz of El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday praised the Biden administration's new plan to offer a pathway to citizenship for undocumented spouses and children of American citizens.

This new streamlined process will permit noncitizen spouses married to U.S. citizens to apply to legally live and work in the U.S. without fear of being deported. In addition to the spouses, noncitizen children of applicants would also be allowed to receive such protections.

To be eligible for this process, noncitizens must have resided in the U.S. for 10 years or more and be legally married to an American citizen while satisfying all other applicable immigration requirements. Those who qualify under these guidelines would be eligible to apply for U.S. citizenship after three years while also being allowed for work authorization in that period of time.

"We welcome today's announcement and the hope it brings to thousands of American families who have grappled with the fear of separation for a decade or more," Seitz shared following Tuesday's announcement from the White House.

This executive action would also relieve the visa process for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), who would be able to stay in the country upon receiving a degree from an American educational institution and a job offer with a company based in the United States.

The Biden administration's announcement comes on the anniversary of DACA, an Obama-era program created to protect eligible young adults who were brought to the United States illegally as children.

"As we commemorate the 12th anniversary of DACA, we've seen the positive impacts such programs can have, not only for beneficiaries themselves but for the families, employers, and communities that rely on them. This new program is sure to yield similar benefits," Seitz stated. "However, as the fate of DACA hangs in the balance, we also know how insufficient these programs are."

This plan of action comes amid an ongoing legislative stalemate on immigration reform. Last month, a bipartisan security bill pushed by the Democrat-led Senate failed to advance on a 43-50 procedural vote. Immigration policy has especially remained a prominent issue leading up to November's presidential election, in which both candidates have spoken extensively of the topic on their campaign trails.

Despite this, Seitz emphasized the importance of advancing legislation centered on families.

"Legislators have a moral and patriotic duty to improve our legal immigration system, including the opportunities available for family reunification and preservation. A society is only as strong as its families, and family unity is a fundamental right," he said. "For the good of the country, Congress must find a way to overcome partisan divisions and enact immigration reformation that includes an earned legalization program for longtime undocumented immigrants."

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The flag of Colombia. / Politicnico Grancolombiano Departamento de Comunicaciones via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)ACI Prensa Staff, Jun 18, 2024 / 17:50 pm (CNA).The bishops of the dioceses located in the Valle del Cauca district of Colombia have demanded that armed groups stop their actions that continue to cause more deaths in the southwestern part of the country and have called on the authorities to "find the solutions" that would bring peace to the country.The prelates issued a statement on June 14 signed by the archbishop of Cali, Luis Fernando Rodríguez; the bishop of Buenaventura, Rubén Darío Jaramillo; Bishop César Alcides Balbín of Cartago; Bishop José Roberto Ospina of Buga; as well as the bishop-elect of Palmira, Father Rodrigo Gallego Trujillo, and the apostolic administrator of the same diocese, Bishop Edgar de Jesús García.In their statement, the prelates decried "the worsening of polarization, threats, harassment, extortion, attacks, murders, and other acts of violence ...

The flag of Colombia. / Politicnico Grancolombiano Departamento de Comunicaciones via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

ACI Prensa Staff, Jun 18, 2024 / 17:50 pm (CNA).

The bishops of the dioceses located in the Valle del Cauca district of Colombia have demanded that armed groups stop their actions that continue to cause more deaths in the southwestern part of the country and have called on the authorities to "find the solutions" that would bring peace to the country.

The prelates issued a statement on June 14 signed by the archbishop of Cali, Luis Fernando Rodríguez; the bishop of Buenaventura, Rubén Darío Jaramillo; Bishop César Alcides Balbín of Cartago; Bishop José Roberto Ospina of Buga; as well as the bishop-elect of Palmira, Father Rodrigo Gallego Trujillo, and the apostolic administrator of the same diocese, Bishop Edgar de Jesús García.

In their statement, the prelates decried "the worsening of polarization, threats, harassment, extortion, attacks, murders, and other acts of violence in Valle del Cauca and in a good part of southwestern Colombia, resulting in uncertainty, sadness, pain, and death, creating fear and eroding the hope of citizens."

Given the situation, the prelates strongly reiterated their call to the armed groups "to cease these actions."

"In the name of the Lord, we exhort those who plan and carry out these insane acts to become aware of the evil they do to the population and even to themselves. Nothing justifies violence!" the bishops stated.

They also asked the authorities on behalf of "the population that feels overwhelmed and afraid" to join forces with civil society "in order to find the solutions that will lead to overcoming this disturbing and painful situation."

In their statement, the bishops of the Valle del Cauca district also reiterated the commitment of the Catholic Church "to continue accompanying all efforts to foster bridges of dialogue that would make it possible to achieve the pacification of hearts and the silencing of weapons."

The Institute of Studies for Development and Peace (Indepaz) noted on its X account that on the same day that the bishops issued their statement, "three people were shot to death in the Nuevo Horizonte neighborhood of Florida, Valle of Cauca."

According to Indepaz, the Dagoberto Ramos Front of the Western Bloc, local gangs, the Adán Izquierdo Company, with "Front 57 possibly moving in," operate in this area. 

The Dagoberto Front and Front 57 are factions of the marxist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) that rejected the 2016 peace agreement with the government.

Indepaz also noted that in its early warning 031/23, the People's Ombudsman's Office stated that "between southern Valle del Cauca and the northern Cauca there is a worsening of the armed conflict and direct violence, not only due to the presence and territorial control of the groups present but also for the entry into these areas of other illegal armed elements."

Indepaz said these groups were not executing a "permanent incursion or operations" in these regions "beyond sporadic transiting or pamphleting."

This story was first published by ACI Prensa, CNA's Spanish-language news partner. It has been translated and adapted by CNA.

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null / Credit: ShutterstockCNA Staff, Jun 18, 2024 / 15:45 pm (CNA).A federal court on Monday protected the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) from a new federal abortion rule as litigation over the directive plays out in court. The USCCB will not be "forced to support employee abortions against their religious beliefs" while a federal lawsuit works its way through the courts, the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty said in a Monday press release.The bishops, along with several other Catholic plaintiffs including the Catholic University of America, filed a lawsuit against the Biden administration last month over regulations that would require that employers accommodate women for workplace limitations that arise from "having or choosing not to have an abortion."The new regulations issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) were related to the implementation of the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA). The pregnancy law ...

null / Credit: Shutterstock

CNA Staff, Jun 18, 2024 / 15:45 pm (CNA).

A federal court on Monday protected the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) from a new federal abortion rule as litigation over the directive plays out in court. 

The USCCB will not be "forced to support employee abortions against their religious beliefs" while a federal lawsuit works its way through the courts, the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty said in a Monday press release.

The bishops, along with several other Catholic plaintiffs including the Catholic University of America, filed a lawsuit against the Biden administration last month over regulations that would require that employers accommodate women for workplace limitations that arise from "having or choosing not to have an abortion."

The new regulations issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) were related to the implementation of the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA). The pregnancy law itself does not mention abortion.

The regulation also includes a prohibition on interference with the accommodations; it further forbids retaliation against a person who uses the accommodations.

The Monday ruling from the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana found that the EEOC "exceeded its statutory authority to implement the PWFA" and in doing so "both unlawfully expropriated the authority of Congress and encroached upon the sovereignty" of the plaintiffs.

The plaintiffs were granted a preliminary injunction "until final judgment is entered" in the case, the ruling said.

District Judge David Joseph said in the decision that the PWFA was not originally passed to include abortion accommodations.

"If Congress had intended to mandate that employers accommodate elective abortions under the PWFA, it would have spoken clearly when enacting the statute, particularly given the enormous social, religious, and political importance of the abortion issue in our nation at this time," the judge said.

The federal government "failed to include a broad religious exception" in the abortion mandate, Joseph wrote. The bishops, the ruling said, "demonstrated a substantial likelihood of success on their claims of statutory and constitutional overreach."

The USCCB praised the decision on Tuesday. 

"We have said from the start that abortion has no place in the pro-life, pro-woman Pregnant Workers Fairness Act," spokeswoman Chieko Noguchi said. 

"We're grateful the court has agreed and look forward to full and permanent respect for our rights and this law's noble purpose," she added. 

Becket senior counsel Laura Wolk Slavis, meanwhile, said in the legal group's press release on Monday that the pro-abortion mandate from the government was "unacceptable and unlawful."

"This ruling is an important step in ensuring that American workplaces can be free to continue serving their communities consistent with their beliefs," she said.

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