• Home
  • About Us
    • Mission
    • Contact Us
    • Get a Spirit FM Decal
    • DJs
    • Shows
    • Program Schedule
    • Submit a Birthday
    • Say the Pledge
    • Spirit FM Features
    • Coverage Map
    • Contest Rules
    • Internships
    • Volunteer
    • Job Openings
    • Public Inspection File
    • EEO
  • Support
  • Concerts & Events
  • Music & Media
  • Faith
  • Listen Live
  • Give Now

Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Soundcloud
Recently Played
Playlist

Features

Celebrate a Birthday on the Air!

Celebrate a Birthday on the Air!

Now we celebrate twice each morning on The Big Big House Morning Show! Click the candles to send us your kid's birthday!

Daily Scripture Reflections

Daily Scripture Reflections

Grow in your faith and in your love of God's Word with original Scripture reflections written by the staff here at Spirit FM.

The Gift of a Day

The Gift of a Day

Give someone the gift of a day and help Spirit FM through a Day Sponsorship. Click to learn how.

Archbishop Gomez: 'Pray hard' for all affected by California shooting

IMAGE: CNS photo/Mike Nelson, EPABy LOS ANGELES (CNS) -- After a shooting spree late Nov. 7 at a country-music bar in Thousand Oaks, about 40 miles from the heart of Los Angeles, Archbishop Jose H. Gomez of Los Angeles asked people to "pray hard" for the victims and their families.Thirteen people, including the suspected gunman and a 29-year veteran of the Ventura County Sheriff's Department, died in shooting at the Borderline Bar & Grill on what was college night, with lessons on country two-step dancing.The bar is popular with students at nearby California Lutheran University, and also attracts students from Pepperdine University in Malibu, Moorpark College in Moorpark and California State University-Channel Islands in Camarillo."Like many of you, I woke this morning to news of the horrible violence last night at the Borderline Grill in Thousand Oaks," Archbishop Gomez said in his Nov. 8 statement."Let us pray hard for all the families, for those who w...

Pope recognizes martyrdom of U.S. Christian Brother

IMAGE: CNS photo/courtesy Christian Brothers of the MidwestBy Cindy WoodenVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Pope Francis has recognized the martyrdom of De La Salle Christian Brother James Miller, who was born in Wisconsin and was shot to death in Guatemala in 1982.The recognition of the martyrdom of Brother James, or Brother Santiago as he also was known, clears the way for his beatification; the date and location of the ceremony were not immediately announced.Publishing news about a variety of sainthood causes Nov. 8, the Vatican said Pope Francis had recognized as "blessed" a 15th-century Augustinian brother, Michael Giedrojc.The recognition amounted to the "equivalent beatification" of Brother Giedrojc, who was born in Lithuania and died in Krakow. With the pope recognizing that over the course of centuries the brother has been venerated by thousands of Catholics, the normal process leading to beatification is not needed.Brother Miller, the U.S. martyr, was born Sept. 2...

Update: Catholic agencies closely monitor giving after clergy sex abuse shock

IMAGE: CNS photo/Mark Blinch, ReutersBy Dennis SadowskiWASHINGTON (CNS) -- Leaders and fundraisers at Catholic organizations are cautiously monitoring the level of donations and gifts as the end-of-the-year giving season approaches, hoping that the clergy sexual abuse scandal won't negatively affect their bottom line.While most of the professionals contacted by Catholic News Service said it is too early yet to see what effect, if any, the abuse crisis may have on giving, some are taking steps to reassure donors that money contributed to vital ministries is not going for settlements to abuse victims or payments to attorneys.The crisis is just one factor that concerns the leaders. There's also the 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act. It's effect on giving remains a question mark. "People remain confused about it," said Franciscan Sister Georgette Lehmuth, president and CEO of the National Catholic Development Conference."The main thing is no one knows. It's way too early," ...

People unwilling to be challenged by God's mercy will grumble, pope says

IMAGE: CNS photo/Vatican MediaBy Carol GlatzVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The sin of grumbling and complaining is often triggered by a desire to avoid being challenged or upset by seeing Christ's unexpected mercy at work, Pope Francis said.The way Christ gave witness was "something new for that era," the pope said, because it was thought that being with sinners "made you impure, like touching a leper."That is why the "doctors of the law," scribes and Pharisees stayed far away from those who sinned and why they complained about Jesus' unusual ways, the pope said Nov. 8 in his homily during Mass in the Domus Sanctae Marthae.They would read but never understand what God meant by "I desire mercy, not sacrifice," the pope said. But Jesus gives concrete witness to this mercy by the way he interacts with people, ending old practices and taking risks.The pope's homily looked at the day's Gospel reading of the parable of the lost sheep, according to St. Luke....

Catholic agencies closely monitor giving after clergy sex abuse shock

IMAGE: CNS photo/Mark Blinch, ReutersBy Dennis SadowskiWASHINGTON (CNS) -- Leaders and fundraisers at Catholic organizations are cautiously monitoring the level of donations and gifts as the end-of-the-year giving season approaches, hoping that the clergy sexual abuse scandal won't negatively affect their bottom line.While most of the professionals contacted by Catholic News Service said it is too early yet to see what effect, if any, the abuse crisis may have on giving, some are taking steps to reassure donors that money contributed to vital ministries is not going for settlements to abuse victims or payments to attorneys.The crisis is just one factor that concerns the leaders. There's also the 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act. It's effect on giving remains a question mark. "People remain confused about it," said Franciscan Sister Georgette Lehmuth, president and CEO of the National Catholic Development Conference."The main thing is no one knows. It's way too early," ...

People unable to give have become slaves to possessions, pope says

IMAGE: CNS photo/Paul HaringBy Carol GlatzVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Life is for loving, not amassing possessions, Pope Francis said.In fact, the true meaning and purpose of wealth is to use it to lovingly serve others and promote human dignity, he said Nov. 7 during his weekly general audience.The world is rich enough in resources to provide for the basic needs of everybody, the pope said. "And yet, many people live in scandalous poverty and resources -- used without discernment -- keep deteriorating. But there is just one world! There is one humanity.""The riches of the world today are in the hands of a minority, of the few, and poverty -- indeed, extreme poverty, and suffering -- are for the many," he told those gathered in St. Peter's Square.The pope continued his series of talks on the Ten Commandments, focusing on the command, "You shall not steal," which reflects respect for other people's property.However, he said, Christians should also read the co...

Pope focuses on 'good politics' for 2019 World Peace Day message

IMAGE: CNS/ReutersBy Carol GlatzVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The world will not have peace without people having mutual trust and respecting each other's word, the Vatican said as it announced Pope Francis' 2019 World Peace Day message would focus on "good politics.""Good politics is at the service of peace" will be the theme for the Jan. 1 commemoration and for the message Pope Francis will write for the occasion, said a Vatican communique published Nov. 6, the day midterm elections were being held in the United States to determine the political makeup of Congress for the next two years as well as a number of posts for state governors and city mayors.The pope's full message for World Peace Day, traditionally released by the Vatican in mid-December, is sent, through Vatican diplomats, to the leaders of nations around the world.The Vatican said Pope Francis' message will underline how political responsibility belongs to all citizens, especially those given the mandate &...

National Review Board chairman seeks fix to address charter 'loophole'

IMAGE: CNS photo/Bob RollerBy Dennis SadowskiWASHINGTON (CNS) -- The National Review Board chairman called for changes to the "Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People" to "make it a less ambiguous document" because despite nearly every diocese meeting its standards in third-party audits, some bishops are facing scrutiny about their handling of reports of wayward priests.Francesco Cesareo, the board's chairman since 2013, told Catholic News Service Nov. 5 that board members have raised concerns for "a long time ... that the audit instrument may not be getting at information that we need to get."He also expressed "frustration" that new questions have surfaced about how some bishops responded to clergy sex abuse, especially after pledging openness and transparency after the 2002 crisis exploded."This is much more of a crisis of a failure of leadership," he said."It is frustrating because on the one hand, you know t...

Daughter's murder becomes chance for restorative justice for her killer

IMAGE: CNS photo/Tyler OrsburnBy Mark PattisonWASHINGTON (CNS) -- What could have been another senseless murder in a society with too many of them already was transformed into restorative justice for the killer and healing for the victim's parents.Kate Grosmaire and her husband, Andy, then in deacon formation, had been to Palm Sunday Mass at their parish in Pensacola, Florida, in 2010 and returned home to work in their garden. They heard the doorbell ring -- an unusual occurrence in their neighborhood, Kate recalled in a Nov. 5 presentation sponsored by the Catholic Mobilizing Network, which advocates for restorative justice and an end to the death penalty.At the door was a victim's assistance coordinator and a county sheriff's deputy with the grim news: "Your daughter's been shot." Ann Grosmaire was just 19 years old. Kate said their first impulse was to get in touch with her boyfriend, Conor McBride, to tell him the news. Then came the gut punch: "Conor's the one w...

Peacemaking begins at home by saying 'no' to rivalry, pope says at Mass

IMAGE: CNS photo/Vatican MediaBy Cindy WoodenVATICAN CITY (CNS) -- World peace must begin in individuals' hearts and in their families by saying "no" to pride and rivalry, Pope Francis said."When we read news about wars -- think about the starvation of children in Yemen, which is a fruit of war -- 'it's far away, poor babies,' but why don't they have anything to eat?" the pope asked during his homily Nov. 5 during Mass in the chapel of his residence.The Mass was celebrated just days after news media reported the death of 7-year-old Amal Hussain, a Yemeni girl, whose photo by Tyler Hicks in the New York Times in mid-October brought renewed attention to the devasting impact the war in Yemen is having on innocent civilians."The same war that we make in our homes, in our institutions" by engaging in rivalry and gossip grows exponentially and leads to real wars that kill people, the pope said at his morning Mass."So," he said, "peace must beg...

Thought of the Day

Urge the younger men, similarly, to control themselves, showing yourself as a model of good deeds in every respect, with integrity in your teaching, dignity, and sound speech that cannot be criticized, so that the opponent will be put to shame without anything bad to say about us.

Titus 2:6-8

 

Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Soundcloud
© 2015 - 2018 Spirit FM 90.5 - All Rights Reserved.